Empty Canvas

Well, our raised bed garden is all set to go for this year. Those two tall sunflowers in the background shot up wild out of nowhere, likely vagrant seeds from the sunflower house we planted for Skippy a few summers back (see photos of that adventure below). The basil was an act of desperation, snatched up at Trader Joe’s because I wasn’t patient enough to wait for the seedlings I’ve ordered to arrive. But the rest, each square foot grid, is empty of plants and filled with fresh organic soil, waiting for something to grow in it. Emptiness waiting to be filled with possibility.

British landscape architect William Kent once said that “gardening is like landscape painting.” And I suppose it is similar in some ways —  you begin with a blank canvas, which might be an empty and barren patch of earth, or one overrun with weeds and stickers. You prime the space by clearing it and turning over the earth, and then carefully plan/compose the arrangements of flowers, vegetables, or shrubs and trees that you want. You select to “paint” with the best seeds or seedlings you can find, and set to work placing them on the canvas of earth in an attempt to match your vision. You do the best you can with what you know, learn new techniques to help the piece along, and try to make up for problems along the way.

But this is where any similarity to landscape painting ends. For the painter has virtually complete control over his project and, eventually, will either finish or abandon his piece. For the gardener, however, what comes next is really out of her hands — and the “piece” is never really finished, but instead demands constant care and attention well beyond the initial endeavor.  Things may grow, or they may not; they may succumb to disease or pests, or may thrive and grow with great energy. Who knows? Like any painter who commits the idea in his mind to canvas, the gardener ultimately deals with uncertainty about what the end result will be.  But unlike the painter, that uncertainty is never eased by a truly finished product.

In the end, gardening, like every other art, is an act of faith in that, ultimately, what happens there doesn’t really depend on the gardener, but on something higher than her. It isn’t for the gardener to worry about what will happen — her job is to do everything she can to create conditions in which something can be made out of nothing, to create a place where the impossible can become possible,  and then she must leave the rest to God.  

Being in the garden teaches me humility, patience, gratitude, hopefulness, trust, perseverance, and joy. It reminds me of the important things I need to pay closer attention to. It reminds me to watch for the ways God works in my life and to trust Him in doing this work, as the unseen gardener that He is. Like Mary Magdalene encountering Jesus in the garden after he has risen from the dead, mostly I don’t recognize his presence or his work in my life. My life is like a garden in which He plants lots of seeds — people, events, ideas, struggles, failures, successes, disappointments — all signs pointing to him, all of which have the potential to grow into something wonderful, into more than they at first seem to be. Every event, just like every seed, contains all that is necessary to produce a gift of grace. Even the smallest, seemingly insignificant detail can grow to become a great oak tree of grace in my life. God is continually making something out of nothing, both in my garden and in my life. And He never fails to surprise me. 

Post Script

A few summers ago, we agreed to forgo the “traditional” vegetable garden I normally plant in order to experiment with a sunflower house for Skippy. It was generally a success — the sunflowers grew nearly as tall as the house and provided a private, cool alcove for him to relax and read a book in. But they also provided a recreational living area for all sorts of creatures, some more amusing than others — we failed to realize that wasps adore the caterpillars that adore sunflowers. So the sunflower house also became a wasp house, of sorts, which Skippy eventually grew afraid to enter. Still, it was a memorable experience and one which we remember fondly.    

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This entry was posted in Art, Basil, Beauty, Books/Reading, Caterpillars, Creativity, Designing, Faith, Family, Flowers, Gardening, General Plants, God, Grace, Gratitude, Hope, Humility, Jesus, Joy, Landscape architecture, Landscape Painting, Life with Skippy, Mary Magdalene, Nature, Patience, Perseverance, Raised bed, Seeds, Sunflower house, Sunflowers, Trust, Values/Morality, Vegetables, Wasps, William Kent. Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Empty Canvas

  1. Kristine Boucher says:

    “her job is to do everything she can to create conditions in which something can be made out of nothing, to create a place where the impossible can become possible, and then she must leave the rest to God — because really. ”
    Beautiful words my friend. Thank you.

    – kris

    • Angela says:

      ….sort of like raising kids, right? 😉
      You have your own beautiful garden of people, my friend, with all of those wonderful children. Cheers!

  2. Bridget says:

    Sweet! We loved it when we had sunflowers! The girls really took to them, but they did not last very long here. We are currently watching our peach tree bloom, along with the many strawberry plants we planted. We miss our tomatoes…but still have our bell peppers!

    Beautiful post! Yes, we are all gardens ready to be tended, weeded, and planted. Bridget

    • Angela says:

      You’re right about the sunflowers, Bridget. It seems like they come and go rather quickly — but they provide a dramatic entrance! I’m jealous of your peaches and strawberries — hoping for strawberries next year. I’ll have plenty of tomatoes to share, so no worries! Here’s to being willing “little” gardens……

  3. Pingback: Seeds of Grace: Empty Canvas, Revisited | one tiny violet

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